Revision to UKAS Accreditation Logo Guidance


BEIS Accreditation Logo & Symbols

BEIS Accreditation Logo & Symbols

The document on use of the accreditation logo & symbols in the United Kingdom and with application for all UKAS-accredited entities was reissued by Department of Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) on 15 February 2017 and is available via a link from the Publications area of the UKAS website.

The revision takes into account of the change from Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) to BEIS. There is no significant change to content.

The new document BEIS Accreditation Logo & Symbols replaces URN/BIS/16/25. Note that it no longer has a ‘URN’ reference and should, therefore, be referred by name.

Certified clients of Certification Bodies, such as those that hold UKAS-accredited ISO 14001:2015 certificates, can use the appropriate UKAS mark and their Certification Body’s Logo in accordance with B 1.2 and the Certification Body’s own procedures.

Certification Bodies can use the UKAS mark in accordance with the main text and the following Appendices as appropriate:

  • Appendix A: Requirements and National Accreditation Symbols for Testing and Calibration Laboratories, Medical Laboratories and Diagnostic Services
  • Appendix B: Requirements and National Accreditation Symbols for Certification Bodies and their certified Clients
  • Appendix C: Requirements and National Accreditation Symbols for Inspection Accreditation
  • Appendix D: Requirements and National Accreditation Symbols for Proficiency Testing Providers
  • Appendix E: Requirements and National Accreditation Symbols for Reference Material Producers
  • Appendix F: Requirements and National Accreditation Symbols for Verification Bodies
  • Appendix H: Use of the Symbols for Multiple Accreditations

It should be noted that the guidance in Appendix G: National Accreditation Logo is restricted to UKAS. The UKAS mark should not be reproduced in advertisements, articles or publications referring to the work of UKAS without permission from UKAS.

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Brexit Briefing: Weekly Media Summary – 30 June 2017


Brexit Briefing - Weekly Summary

Brexit Briefing – Weekly Summary

This Friday’s edition of the Brexit Briefing is part of the series of posts to highlight articles published in the media covering Brexit from an environmental perspective.

The articles are presented in chronological order with the most recent articles first. They are not presented in any specific order of importance & are provided as a selected sample of news articles to promote understanding of the key environmental issues as they develop during the Brexit process.

The selected articles this week are:

The UK has a government: Theresa May’s Queen’s Speech passes as MPs defeat all amendments (BusinessInsiderUK, 30 June 2017)

Government’s Queen’s Speech clears Commons (BBC, 29 June 2017)

‘Brexit won’t change environmental liability laws’ (Insurance Business, 28 June 2017)

Brexit ‘tragic’ for the environment, warns Potocnik (LetsRecycle, 28 June 2017)

Environmental Law will Pose Immense Challenges in Run Up to Brexit (E3G, 28 June 2017)

UK risks becoming ‘dumping ground’ for plastic after Brexit (The Guardian, 28 June 2017)

National Park seeks to shape post-Brexit farming policy (CumbriaCrack, 27 June 2017)

Catalysing green finance: a priority for the new government (edie.net, 27 June 2017)

Here’s where the DUP and the Tories might disagree (Channel 4 News, 26 June 2017)

Brexit challenges hang over equities (FT, 26 June 2017)

Analysis: What the leaked EU-Japan trade deal tells us about Brexit (EnergyDesk Greenpeace, 26 June 2017)

Long-term government environment plan could be shelved until 2018 (Resource, 26 June 2017)

Hard Brexit could halt Heathrow expansion plans, says Lord Adonis (The Guardian, 26 June 2017)

Energy professionals want ‘predictable, no-surprises policy environment’ (Energy Live News, 26 June 2017)

One year on, DAERA prepares for Brexit (FarmingLife, 24 June 2017)

Green coalition assess environmental policy risks of Brexit (Environment Analyst, 23 June 2017)

From air quality to renewables: the Brexit environmental fears (The Herald, 24 June 2017)

Hard Brexit under threat as MPs from all parties plan alliance to defeat Theresa May’s plans (The Independent, 24 June 2017)

Brexit negotiations begin in Brussels (EEF, 23 June 2017)

Brexit, One Year On: Green Tape, Fossil Fuels, and Climate Science Deniers (DeSmogUK, 22 June 2017)

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Brexit Briefing: The Great Repeal Bill – Domesticating EU Law


The Great Repeal Bill - Domesticating EU Law

The Great Repeal Bill – Domesticating EU Law

The global law firm, Linklaters has launched a report produced in conjunction with the International Regulatory Strategy Group, a practitioner-led body comprising leading UK-based figures from the financial and professional services industry, co-sponsored by The City UK and the City of London Corporation.

The report: The Great Repeal Bill: Domesticating EU Law seeks to address the issues raised in the United Kingdom government’s recent White Paper on the “Great Repeal Bill” (see my earlier post: The process for the Great Repeal Bill starts…).

The report proposes a simple and efficient approach to the adoption and adaptation of EU and EU-derived law, saving UK businesses and government time, money and resources with a key recommendation for setting continuity, certainty, timeliness, simplicity and consistency as the overarching objective for the Great Repeal Bill & for the establishment of a statutory advisory body, under parliamentary supervision, able to give guidance on issues of construction and application if ambiguities arise.

The Eight Guiding Principles

The Eight Guiding Principles

The proposed process is supported through eight guiding principles to be followed in the adaptation and interpretation of the domesticated law.

The basis for the EU acquis and implementing legislation will continue to apply, as UK law, as they stand at the exit date with relevant domestic policy changes and exclusions.

UK law rights and obligations will continue on exit day
(subject to policy change or exclusion) together with the EU acquis and implementing legislation will come with its history.

The territorial scope of the domesticated acquis
will generally be limited to the UK with the UK courts to take a purposive approach to interpreting the acquis, implementing legislation and the Great Repeal Bill.

Finally, the UK Government will provide guidance and consultations.

The Five Rules

The Five Rules

Supporting the eight Principles are Five Rules for the statutory Interpretation for EU and EU-derived law which it is suggested deal with most of the corrections needed without using ‘Henry VIII’ powers that the UK Government have had problems with in the case of R(Gina Miller and others) v The Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union

References in any UK or EU legislation and regulation to other EU legislation, law or acts after the exit date shall be to the relevant legislation, law or act under the authority of Parliament or relevant devolved assembly.

Although the UK will have left the EU, EU legislation and UK implementing legislation and rules shall be construed as if the UK were a Member State and only apply within the UK.

The functions of any EU institution or agency as at the exit date, be construed as being functions of the relevant Minister or department in accordance with a matrix allocating responsibilities.

Finally, the obligations of the UK and UK institutions will be subject to the following sub-rules:

  1. Obligations to co-operate become powers
  2. Restrictions on national measures are disapplied
  3. No dependence on prior acts.

Whilst I do not have formal legal training, I have worked with the development of EU legislation and in supporting countries adopting EU legislation, such as Poland and Hungary & neighbouring countries, such as Ukraine. The proposals appear to hold merit for wider consideration, discussion and adoption even if the phrase “The devil is in the detail” may arise more than once over the exit process.

If you are interested to keep up-to-date on this developing issue, you should download a copy of the report from the Linklaters’ website here

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Serious eLearning Manifesto – Helping your sustainability journey


onePlanet Solutions is proud to be a signatory to the Serious eLearning Manifesto

onePlanet Solutions is proud to be a signatory to the Serious eLearning Manifesto

Through my delivery of sustainability and environmental management to my clients, I have given my endorsement to the Serious eLearning Manifesto, a set of 22 principles designed to improve the effectiveness of eLearning as a learning and development tool.

The Manifesto was developed in 2014 by leading figures in the eLearning industry, which is more than a Code of Practice, it encourages training providers to adopt a client-centric view that will add value by delivering meaningful, measurable, real-world improvements in individual and organisational performance.

The key principles are to:

  • Be meaningful to learners
  • Be engagement-driven
  • Contain authentic contexts
  • Facilitate realistic decisions
  • Present individualised challenges
  • Encourage spaced practice
  • Present real-world consequences

I intend to use the Manifesto as the basis for my business ethos for better understanding the needs of our training clients and to support them through their sustainability journey.

Do you want to share that journey?

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NEWT.N – A web app for HSI assessment of ponds


NEWT.N - A web app for HSI assessment of ponds

NEWT.N – A web app for HSI assessment of ponds

The Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) for Great Crested Newts is based on the HSI methodology developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as a means of evaluating habitat quality and quantity using a numerical index, between 0 and 1.

The HSI for Great Crested Newt incorporates ten suitability indices, all of which are factors known to affect this species.

I have used the Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) framework in the past for an initial field assessment of the capability of the habitat to support Great Crested Newts near to construction sites & even developed a simple Microsoft Excel spreadsheet to drive the underlying calculations.

An enterprising ecologist – Martin Brammah (Principal Ecologist at MLM Group) has taken the development further with a web app, NEWT.N, which allows ecologists and any other interested parties to undertake Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) assessments of ponds on and within 500 m of development sites, both in the field using mobile data and in the office.

The app has a built-in Google maps tool to allow selection of a 1 km-radius circle around the pond on the map and count any ponds within that circle to give you your pond count for suitability index 8. The mapping tool can, also, be used to draw a 500 m or 250 m radius around a point, which can be useful for identifying ponds for consideration around smaller sites.

The app allows users to select the relevant pond parameters from drop down menus, for each of the ten suitability indices. Based on these individual scores, it automatically calculates and presents the HSI score with an indication of the suitability of the pond for Great Crested Newts.

If your device has an installed Microsoft Exchange or Outlook, it is possible to email the results to anyone together with a photo of the pond).

It should be noted that the calculations and figures in the app are based on the guidance given in the Amphibian and Reptile Groups of the United Kingdom (ARG) UK Advice Note 5 on the Great Crested Newt Habitat Suitability Index (May 2010).

If you have a need to undertake Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) for Great Crested Newts, I urge you to look at NEWT.N and try it yourself.

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Brexit Briefing: Weekly Media Summary – 23 June 2017


Brexit Briefing - Weekly Summary

Brexit Briefing – Weekly Summary

This Friday’s edition of the Brexit Briefing is part of the series of posts to highlight articles published in the media covering Brexit from an environmental perspective.

The articles are not presented in any specific order of importance & are provided as a selected sample of news articles to promote understanding of the key environmental issues as they develop during the Brexit process.

The selected articles this week are:

Brexit may divide but the Environment unites (EEB MetaMorphosis, 22 June 2017)

Three Challenges to Environmental Protection from Brexit (EEB Meta Morphosis, 22 June 2017)

Theresa May to present Brexit plans to EU leaders (BBC, 22 June 2017)

Tories aim to block full EU ban on bee-harming pesticides (The Guardian, 22 June 2017)

Brexit, Climate and Sustainability: Vinexpo Bordeaux 2017 Drilled Deep into Global Issues (WineIndustryAdvisor.com, 21 June 2017)

Scottish rural ministers demand seat at Brexit negotiating table (The Press and Journal, 21 June 2017)

MSPs will get the chance to vote down key Brexit bill (The Scotsman, 21 June 2017)

Brexit Government bills central to Queen’s Speech (HolticultureWeek, 21 June 2017)

Queen’s Speech summary: Bill-by-bill at a glance (BBC, 21 June 2017)

Queen’s Speech tears up most of Tory manifesto (ITN, 21 June 2017)

LIVE: Queen’s Speech tears up Theresa May’s key manifesto pledges (Sky News, 21 June 2017)

May drops key pledges in Queen’s Speech (The Times, 21 June 2017)

May drops key manifesto pledges from Queen’s speech (The Guardian, 21 June 2017)

Queen’s Speech live: Theresa May tears up Tory manifesto pledges as she unveils plans for hard Brexit (The Telegraph, 21 June 2017)

Labour urged to put single market option back into Brexit debate (The Guardian, 20 June 2017)

Queen’s Speech: Environment groups urge government to deliver green Great Repeal Bill (BusinessGreen, 20 June 2017)

Brexit deal talks are positive, says MP Glyn Davies (Shropshire Star, 21 June 2017)

A democratic Brexit can only be achieved with cross-party consensus (The Guardian, 18 June 2017)

EEF part of industry call for Brexit strategy re-think (EEF, 16 June 2017)

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Brexit Briefing: The Queen’s Speech 2017


Brexit Briefing - Queen's Speech 2017

Brexit Briefing – Queen’s Speech 2017

The Queen’s Speech forms part of the State Opening of the United Kingdom’s Parliament for each session and today (21 June 2017 – 11:30 Hrs BST) follows the same tradition without the usual “pomp and circumstance” as it was not possible to prepare the normal State Carriage and other ceremonial elements as the snap General Election did not provide enough time for practise and security measures between the Trooping of the Colour for the Queen’s Birthday and the State Opening.

The Queen’s Speech sets out the Prime Minister’s legislative plans for the new session of parliament. Already it has been highlighted that the next proposed Queen’s Speech will be cancelled to make way for the increased parliamentary time needed for the Brexit debates.

Some of the run-up to the State Opening of Parliament has been overshadowed by the Conservative / Democratic Unionist Party “confidence and supply” arrangement negotiations, which may yet see the Queen’s Speech vote resulting in a slim margin for the Conservative Government with support from the DUP.

Given the current status of Brexit negotiations, the Speech covered the Great Repeal Bill as the foundation to deal with over 1,200 EU Laws to ensure that they become UK legislation upon leaving the European Union.

Also, following the Conservative Manifesto issued during the General Election, other policy and legislation developments affecting the environment included a new agri-environment system to replace the European Union’s Common Agriculture Policy & a new regime for commercial fishing and to withdraw from the London Fisheries Convention including the Common Fisheries Policy.

The full text of the Queen’s Speech can be found here with an accompanying Policy Paper covering the individual Bills in further details can be viewed here.

Initial reaction from Media Sources are provided below:

Queen’s Speech summary: Bill-by-bill at a glance (BBC)

Queen’s Speech tears up most of Tory manifesto (ITN)

LIVE: Queen’s Speech tears up Theresa May’s key manifesto pledges (Sky News)

May drops key pledges in Queen’s Speech (The Times)

May drops key manifesto pledges from Queen’s speech (The Guardian)

Queen’s Speech live: Theresa May tears up Tory manifesto pledges as she unveils plans for hard Brexit (The Telegraph)

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