Brexit Briefing: Weekly Media Summary – 1 September 2017


Brexit Briefing - Weekly Summary

Brexit Briefing – Weekly Summary

This Friday’s edition of the Brexit Briefing is part of the series of posts to highlight articles published in the media covering Brexit from an environmental perspective.

The articles are presented in chronological order with the most recent articles first. They are not presented in any specific order of importance & are provided as a selected sample of news articles to promote understanding of the key environmental issues as they develop during the Brexit process.

The selected articles this week are:

‘Divorce bill’ row frustrates Brexit talks (BBC, 31 August 2017)

Brexit Talks End in Acrimony Amid Stalemate Over Bill (Bloomberg, 31 August 2017)

Reports: May taps Sir John Randall as new environment adviser (BusinessGreen, 30 August 2017)

Will Brexit harm our Westcountry beaches? (ITV News, 30 August 2017)

Is a Green Brexit Likely to Happen? (Environmental Technology, 30 August 2017)

Brexit threatens product availability (LogisticsManager, 30 August 2017)

Brexit has led to shift in tone on fracking, says Ineos boss (The Scotsman, 28 August 2017)

UK Home Office ‘cannot be trusted’, say EU citizens’ rights groups (The Guardian, 28 August 2017)

New regulation can be more effective for farmers after Brexit, NFU says (HorticultureWeek, 28 August 2017)

Broad appeal of Labour’s new stance on Brexit (The Guardian, 27 August 2017)

Brexit: Money and other disputes dog EU-UK talks (BBC, 26 August 2017)

Does Chlorinated Chicken Affect the Environment? (EnvironmentalTechnology, 26 August 2017)

Rebecca Pow: Managed decline isn’t enough – we must leave the environment in a better state than we found it (ConservativeHome, 26 August 2017)

Does the row over EU courts leave green laws in a tangle? (BusinessGreen, 24 August 2017)

Does the row over EU courts leave green laws in a tangle? (BusinessGreen, 24 August 2017)

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BAT Conclusions For Large Combustion Plants published


Best Available Techniques Conclusions for Large Combustion Plants have been published

Best Available Techniques Conclusions for Large Combustion Plants have been published

Thursday, 17 August 2017 saw the publication of the “BAT (Best Available Techniques) Conclusions for Large Combustion Plants (LCP)” in the Official Journal of  the European Union, which, principally, to the energy and heating sectors.

There is a four-year period for industry to modify their installations to meet the new requirements established in the BAT Conclusions for LCP with the period starting from the date of publication (17 August 2017)

The Competent Authority in each Member State (the Environment Agency in England or devolved Agency in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland) has six months from 17 August 2017 to undertake compliance inspections for the installations subject to IPPC (Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control) permits against the requirements laid down in the BAT Conclusions for LCP.

If the compliance inspection reveals a need to amend an IPPC permit, the Competent Authority should:

  • Inform the operator of the installation that it must modify the installation within four years starting from 17 August 2017 to the requirements contained in the BAT Conclusions for LCP; and
  • Require the operator of the installation to apply for a modification / amendment of the IPPC permit within one year of the date of delivery of the request, specifying the scope of the application related to the amendments resulting from the compliance inspection.

A derogation from the emission limit values established in the BAT Conclusions for LCP may be applied for under the Environmental Protection Act.

A copy of the BAT Conclusions for LCP can be downloaded here

Posted in Air pollution, Compliance, Energy, Environment Agency, Environmental, European Union, Greenhouse Gas, Heavy Metals | Leave a comment

Brexit Briefing: Weekly Media Summary – 25 August 2017


Brexit Briefing - Weekly Summary

Brexit Briefing – Weekly Summary

This Friday’s edition of the Brexit Briefing is part of the series of posts to highlight articles published in the media covering Brexit from an environmental perspective.

The articles are presented in chronological order with the most recent articles first. They are not presented in any specific order of importance & are provided as a selected sample of news articles to promote understanding of the key environmental issues as they develop during the Brexit process.

The selected articles this week are:

Kenny MacAskill: Lexit is as damaging as Brexit, and its proponents are equally deluded (The Scotsman, 24 August 2017)

Lack of post-Brexit clarity impacting rural land market, survey warns (FarmingUK, 24 August 2017)

Who will enforce environmental laws after Brexit? (ClientEarth, 23 August 2017)

The Guardian view on UK Brexit policy: this time the lady is for turning (The Guardian, 23 August 2017)

UK faces post-Brexit environmental ‘governance gap’, warns green coalition (edie, 23 August 2017)

EU could retain fishing rights in UK waters after Brexit (BusinessInsiderUK, 22 August 2017)

Nicola Sturgeon and Welsh FM meet to prevent “blatant power grab by Whitehall” after Brexit (CommonSpace, 22 August 2017)

Think tank highlights broadband in post-EU rural policy (UKAuthority, 22 August 2017)

Amending environmental law: Henry VIII and scrutiny (UKELA, 22 August 2017)

Serious farm pollution breaches rise in UK – and many go unprosecuted (The Guardian, 20 August 2017)

‘Hard’ Brexit offers ‘£135bn annual boost’ to economy (BBC, 20 August 2017)

Brexit: Slovenian PM Deals Crushing Blow To UK Government’s Strategy (Huffington Post, 20 August 2017)

Scotland and Wales environment ministers band together on Brexit strategy (BusinessGreen, 18 August 2017)

Brexit threatens environmental ambition (wiredGov, 17 August 2017)

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CONSULTATION: ISO DIS 19011


CONSULTATION: ISO DIS 19011 on auditing

CONSULTATION: ISO DIS 19011 on auditing of Management Systems

The revision of ISO 19011:2011 is well underway with the current DIS (Draft International Standard) available for public comment during a consultation phase. The DIS is available for public comments from 4 August 2017 to 26 September 2017.

ISO 19011 is an important International Standard as it provides guidance on auditing management systems including the principles of auditing, managing an audit programme and conducting management system audits. Additionally, it provides guidance on the evaluation of competence of individuals involved in the audit process including the person managing the audit programme, auditors and audit teams.

As such, ISO 19011 is applicable to all organizations that need to conduct internal or external audits of management systems or manage an audit programme. The application of ISO 19011 to other types of audits is possible provided that special consideration is given to the specific competence needed.

It should be noted that the conduct of third-party auditing through certification / registrar bodies is managed through the accreditation process to ISO/IEC 17021-1:2015 & for environmental management systems, auditor competence is specified in ISO/IEC 17021-2:2016 and for environmental management systems, auditor competence is specified in ISO/IEC 17021-3:2017.

A copy of ISO DIS 19011 is available from ISO and BSi as an Adobe Acrobat (PDF) file or hardcopy.

I, strongly, advise commenting on the DIS version of the revised ISO 19011 as this will be the last opportunity to influence the drafting of the International Standard before its final publication later in 2017 / early 2018 by either purchasing a copy or by visiting the BSI Standards Development portal, where it is possible to view the text and to make comments directly to BSI “free of change”.

Free access to ISO DIS 19011 is available at the BSI Standards Development portal

Free access to ISO DIS 19011 is available at the BSI Standards Development portal

If you plan to use the BSI Draft Review portal, you should head search for “ISO DIS 19011” and register here for free access.

Whichever method you use, please take time to review the ISO DIS 19011 as this International Standard will have significant influence over the auditing of Management Systems for at least the next five years.

The deadline for comment on ISO DIS 19011 to BSI is 26 September 2017.

Posted in Auditing, Business Benefits, Environmental Management, Quality Management | Leave a comment

UK Greenhouse Gas Reporting: Conversion Factors 2017


UK Methodology Paper for GHG Conversion Factors for Company Reporting 2017

UK Methodology Paper for GHG Conversion Factors for Company Reporting 2017

The UK Government Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) has published the emission conversion factors, that can be used to report on 2017 Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions by UK-based organisations of all sizes, and for international organisations reporting on UK operations.

The version referenced in this article has been published on 4 August 2017.

There are three sets of conversion factors:

  • Condensed set:
    This is the most frequently requested dataset by users, which comprises an abridged version of the full set of factors, designed to reduce the volume of information users have to navigate through to find the factors they want. Recommended for most, and new, users of conversion factors
  • Full set:
    This is the full dataset of factors, which contains all of the available factors for the selected year, and is recommended for advanced users only due to the volume of information presented.
  • Flat file set:
    This dataset contains the same information as the full set, but arranged for automated processes – available from 2014 onwards. Not recommended for most users

An accompanying methodology paper explains how the conversion factors are derived, which can be downloaded here

It is recommended for:

New users of the conversion factors to download the condensed set of conversion factors from the latest available year and read the guidance in the document’s introductory sheet and follow the informative text at the top of each conversion factor tab in the output files.

Advanced or repeat users of the conversion factors to download your preferred factor set and read the ‘what’s new’ sheet before using the conversion factors. This sheet highlights the most significant changes to the conversion factors made in this update. Following the ‘what’s new’ guidance will ensure that reporting is consistent and comparable year-on-year.

Posted in Auditing, Business Benefits, Carbon Management, Greenhouse Gas | Leave a comment

Brexit Biefing: Continuity in the availability of goods for the EU and the UK


Brexit Position Paper -Continuity in the availability of goods for the EU and the UK

Brexit Position Paper – Continuity in the availability of goods for the EU and the UK

The UK Government published a further Position Paper in their Brexit series today (21 August 2017).

This latest Brexit Position Paper covers continuity in availability of goods for the EU and UK but makes no explicit mention of the environmental considerations, such as eco-design and life-cycle.

It is disappointing to see that the process for continued eco-design has not be explicitly stated as for some specified goods, such as those electrical goods covered by The Ecodesign of Energy Related Products Directive 2009/125/EC.

It may be anticipated that these issues will be covered in a subsequent Position Paper but it does not bode well for continued environmental protection in a post-Brexit era.

Instead of specifics, the paper proposes four principles as follows:

Principle A:
Goods placed on the Single Market before exit should continue to circulate freely in the UK and the EU, without additional requirements or restrictions

Principle B:
Where businesses have undertaken compliance activities prior to exit, they should not be required to duplicate these activities

Principle C:
The agreement should facilitate the continued oversight of goods

Principle D:
Where the goods are supplied with services, there should be no restriction to the provision of these services that could undermine the agreement on goods.

We can only look forward to greater coverage of how these principles can be applied to post-Brexit environmental protection in subsequent Position Papers.

In the meantime, a copy of the Brexit Position Paper can be downloaded here

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Brexit Briefing: Weekly Media Summary – 18 August 2017


Brexit Briefing - Weekly Summary

Brexit Briefing – Weekly Summary

This Friday’s edition of the Brexit Briefing is part of the series of posts to highlight articles published in the media covering Brexit from an environmental perspective.

The articles are presented in chronological order with the most recent articles first. They are not presented in any specific order of importance & are provided as a selected sample of news articles to promote understanding of the key environmental issues as they develop during the Brexit process.

The selected articles this week are:

Environmental law undermined by Brexit ‘power grab’, warn Scottish and Welsh ministers (Holyrood, 17 August 2017)

Scotland and Wales coordinate opposition to Brexit “green” legislation (MercoPress, 17 August 2017)

European Union To Link Emissions Trading System With Switzerland (Clean Technica, 17 August 2017)

Scots and Welsh environment ministers meet over Brexit (BBC News, 17 August 2017)

Brexit bill ‘could hit green policies’ (The Press and Journal, 17 August 2017)

Michael Gove’s actions are simply not enough (BrightGreen, 16 August 2017)

How will Brexit affect the environment? Brexit means podcast (The Guardian, 16 August 2017)

Public overwhelmingly backs British farming amid Brexit uncertainty, survey suggests (Farminguk, 16 August 2017)

Government promises to maintain ‘high environmental standards’ in post-Brexit trade (BusinessGreen, 15 August 2017)

Are we heading for a ‘Green Brexit’? Who the hell knows (BusinessGreen, 14 August 2017)

David Miliband demands SECOND Brexit vote (not the right result first time Dave?) (Daily Express, 13 August 2017)

Abusive Brexit debate insults our intelligence (The Guardian, 13 August 2017)

“Dear Mr Gove…”: the Countryfile experts offer the Environment Secretary their advice in the build up to Brexit (The Radio Times, 13 August 2017)

David Miliband calls for second EU referendum and praises ‘valiant’ Philip Hammond The Telegraph, 13 August 2017)

Britons Should Be Given Second Brexit Vote, Says Former Foreign Minister (U.S.News, 12 August 2017)

Tory Brexit policy is chaotic: the fightback against this stitch-up must begin at once (the Guardian, 12 August 2017)

John McDonnell claims that Government’s EU exit plans are in chaos (The Herald, 10 August 2017)

The UK is now a world leader in one god-awful trade and it confirms our biggest fear about Brexit (The Canary, 10 August 2017)

The experts strike back! How economists are being proved right on Brexit (The Guardian, 10 August 2017)

UK govt close to publishing Brexit position papers – report (DigitalLook, 9 August 2017)

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