Brexit Briefing: Weekly Media Summary – 2 February 2018


Brexit Briefing - Weekly Summary

This Friday’s edition of the Brexit Briefing is part of the series of posts to highlight articles published in the media covering Brexit from an environmental perspective.

The articles are presented in chronological order with the most recent articles first. They are not presented in any specific order of importance & are provided as a selected sample of news articles to promote understanding of the key environmental issues as they develop during the Brexit process.

The selected articles from this past week, which saw comments by President Trump on “How he would have managed Brexit”, fundamental differences in Conservative thinking on Brexit, Theresa May comes under fire from within her own Party, are:

Brighton peers criticise Brexit bill in House of Lords debate (Brighton and Hove News, 2 February 2018)

Under Pressure to Resign, U.K.’s May Says She’s ‘Not a Quitter’ (Bloomberg, 31 January 2018)

EU Agree Transitional Deal Guidelines “Within Two Minutes” as Conservative Party Pressure May for a Sincere Brexit (PoundSterlingLive, 31 January 2018)

UK poorer in every Brexit scenario, says leaked report (Economia, 30 January 2018)

Don’t just muddle through Brexit, ex-minister warns (BBC News, 30 January 2018)

U.K. Annoys EU With Call for Help Defining Brexit Plan, Sources Say (Bloomberg, 30 January 2018)

Ministers reject calls to publish leaked Brexit study (BBC News, 30 January 2018)

EU agrees Brexit ‘transition’ negotiation guidelines (BBC News, 29 January 2018)

Brexit: EU Withdrawal Bill fundamentally flawed, say peers (BBC News, 29 January 2018)

Conservatives ‘must come together’, says David Lidington (BBC News, 29 January 2018)

Jeremy Corbyn rules out second Brexit referendum (The Herald, 28 January 2018)

Trump on Brexit: ‘I would have negotiated differently’ (BBC News, 28 January 2018)

George Eustice – ‘Farmers should take another look at Countryside Stewardship Schemes’ (FarmersGuardian, 26 January 2018)

Report on the potential impact of Brexit published (Lexology, 26 January 2018)

EU Is Open to Brexit Transition Lasting Beyond 2020, Sources Say (Bloomberg, 26 January 2018)

Neonics, Brexit and beyond (Ecologist, 26 January 2018)

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IAF to Establish an Database of Accredited Management Systems Certifications


As reported in an earlier post: IAF Study may lead to global database of Management Systems certificates (9 August 2016), the International Accreditation Forum (IAF) has been revising the set of principles of the Database, and working on further development and implementation issues over the course of 2016 and 2017.

An accessible database of accredited certificates, such as ISO 14001, ISO 9001, ISO 45001 and ISO 50001 & ISO/IEC 27001, can potentially be beneficial for:

Businesses:
To access relevant information on accredited certifications held by their suppliers or partners within their supply chain.

Accreditation Bodies
To be able to access relevant data to develop and target their accreditation assessment of certification bodies.

Regulatory Bodies
To be able to access data of relevant data for their monitoring and enforcement work, such as the UK’s Environment Agency to be able to access the status of the ISO 14001 accredited certification of regulated businesses.

Government / NGOs / Academia
To be able to access reliable data on accredited certification for research and policy development.

Now, it can reported that IAF General Assembly members made a historic decision by voting to affirmatively proceed with the development of an IAF Database of Accredited Management Systems Certificates.

This has not been a decision taken lightly as it will be recalled that an earlier proposal by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to develop a database of management systems certifications was abandoned in 2014.

Over the past two years, IAF Database Management Committee (IAF DMC) has taken two years to explore the feasibility and merits of the proposal database, explore potential suppliers, manage a tender and presented the business case to members in advance of the IAF General Assembly held in Vancouver in October 2017.

Now, this momentous decision gives authority to the IAF DMC to undertake the work to create the database a delivery it through a new Limited Liability Company, wholly-owned by IAF, and given the responsibility for contracting with an IT supplier and oversight of the database. It is anticipated that the database will be available before the end of 2018.

ACTION POINTS

  1. Review the implications on your business, such as the greater availability of ISO 14001 accredited certification data or the availability of your accredited-certifications being accessed by third-parties to understand how the IAF database may affect your business.
  2. Consider the opportunities for using of the IAF database within your business.
  3. Check back for further updates on the development of the IAF database in the late Summer / Autumn 2018 based on its current developmental programme.
Posted in Accreditation, Business Benefits, Environmental, ISO 14001, ISO 50001, ISO 9001, ISO/IEC 17021-1, ISO/IEC 27001 | Leave a comment

Brexit Briefing: Weekly Media Summary – 26 January 2018


 

Brexit Briefing - Weekly Summary

This Friday’s edition of the Brexit Briefing is part of the series of posts to highlight articles published in the media covering Brexit from an environmental perspective.

The articles are presented in chronological order with the most recent articles first. They are not presented in any specific order of importance & are provided as a selected sample of news articles to promote understanding of the key environmental issues as they develop during the Brexit process.

The selected articles from this past week, which saw a “dry patch” for discussions, Boris offers, and is criticised for, a “Brexit Dividend” of £100m a day for the NHS & concerns that a deal has been done for a “Norway-style” Brexit transition, are:

Brexit is a chance to take back control of our environment (Politico, 25 January 2018)

Turnover of ministers in Government is disrupting Brexit preparations, report claims (Express, 25 January 2018)

Cuts to environmental spending have led to green indicators “declining or at best flat-lining”, MSPs warn (Holyrood, 24 January 2018)

Brexit transition phase not a deferral – David Davis (BBC News, 24 January 2018)

Brexit Bulletin: The Other Bill (Bloomberg, 24 January 2018)

Concerns raised over budget for environmental research (The Herald, 23 January 2018)

UK green protections at ‘high risk’ post-Brexit (edie, 23 January 2018)

UK sets out its post-Brexit vision for farming (The Leader, 23 January 2018)

European consulting markets look strong for 2018 (EnvironmentAnalyst, 23 January 2018)

Brexit: UK has already ‘agreed in principle’ with EU to Norway-style transition (Independent, 23 January 2018)

Boris Johnson rebuked over NHS cash plea (BBC News, 23 January 2018)

Cabinet talks must stay private, PM tells Boris Johnson (The Press, 23 January 2018)

Whatever happened to the Brexit talks? (BBC News, 22 January 2018)

Majority of U.K. MPs Would Accept Staying in Single Market: Poll (Bloomberg, 22 January 2018)

Green groups express concern over post-Brexit air quality goals (AirQualityNews, 22 January 2018)

Brexit and Cumbrian fell management issues raised during farmers meeting (CumbriaCrack, 22 January 2018)

Boris Johnson to demand £100 million extra per week for NHS after Brexit (Evening Standard, 22 January 2018)

2/2 Staying in the customs union means effectively staying in the EU: the EU *is* a customs union. It means no new free trade deals, no new export opportunities, and no leading role in the WTO. (Twitter – Boris Johnson, 21 January 2018)

Westminster urged to listen to devolved administrations ahead of Brexit talks (The Herald, 21 January 2018)

Scotland to match EU ban on single use plastics by 2030 ‘Brexit or no Brexit’ (The Herald, 21 January 2018)

 

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RPS 9: Collect and store mixed fuel from misfuelled vehicles


The Environment Agency for England has issued a new regulatory position statement (RPS 9), which applies to businesses who remove, transport and store mixed fuel from vehicles that have been misfuelled

This RPS will have limited application as it may only impact upon whose businesses who provide services for the removal of mixed fuel from misfuelled vehicles but could have a wider application for any business that may find itself with a misfuelled vehicle.

RPS 9 Conditions
You must:

  1. use collection vehicles that are designed and only used to remove and transport mixed fuel from vehicles that have been misfuelled
  2. make sure the mixed fuels are collected by a fuel tanker that’s approved by the Carriage of Dangerous Goods, or ensure the correct thresholds apply for the mixed fuel to be transported as a ‘small load’
  3. only store mixed fuel in tanks or containers that comply with BS EN 12285-2:2005 for below ground tanks, or UL 2085 for above ground tanks
  4. store mixed fuel in a tank or container with a minimum secondary containment volume of 110% of the tank or container
  5. make sure the total capacity of the storage tank or container does not exceed 23,000 litres
  6. only use tanks or containers with an overfill prevention system, such as a high level alarm
  7. make sure that only trained vehicle operators transfer the mixed fuel into the storage tank or container – this must be done using the vehicle’s flame-proof pump and by the end of the working day
  8. have procedures in place to respond to overfill incidents
  9. have an oil spill kit available so vehicle operators can respond quickly to control any spills

Any user of this RPS should ensure that they comply with the Hazardous Waste Regulations and the requirements for Consignment Notes.

You must make sure the tyres do not endanger human health or the environment.
You must not:

  • cause a risk to water, air, soil, plants or animals
  • cause a nuisance through noise or odours
  • adversely affect the countryside or places of special interest

Enforcement
An RPS means that the Environment Agency will not normally take enforcement action against you provided:

  1. your activity meets the description set out in this RPS
  2. you comply with the conditions set out in this RPS
  3. your activity does not (and is not likely to) cause environmental pollution or harm human health

Time Expiry of RPS
RPS 9 is time-limited and is proposed to be reviewed on 31 December 2020.

A copy of the Environment Agency’s Regulatory Position Statement 9 is freely available here

ACTION POINTS

  1. Review your current activities as a business removing (or needing to have removed) mixed fuel from misfuelled vehicles to understand whether the Environment Agency’s RPS 9 applies to your organisation and activities as a compliance obligation.
  2. If RPS 9 applies to your activities for the removal of mixed fuel from misfuelled vehicles follow the conditions of the RPS.
  3. Check back for any revised guidance with the Environment Agency no later than 31 December 2020
Posted in Business Benefits, Compliance, Environment Agency, Waste | Leave a comment | Edit
Posted in Business Benefits, Compliance, Waste | Leave a comment

Using waste tyres in escape ladders in water storage reservoirs


The Environment Agency for England has issued a new regulatory position statement (RPS 139) applies to businesses who to use waste tyres in escape ladders in water storage reservoirs.

This RPS will have limited application as it may only impact upon companies within the water sector but will have wider application for businesses with stocks of waste tyres.

RPS 139 Conditions
You must:

  1. have written confirmation from the Environment Agency that you can use waste tyres in this way
  2. make sure the tyres in the ladder are at least 10 metres apart
  3. store the tyres with a 10 metre fire break between piles
  4. already have an abstraction licence for the reservoir
  5. already have planning permission

You must not:

  • use more than 1,000 tyres
  • store more than 500 tyres in a pile
  • bring tyres to the site before the project starts
  • store the tyres for more than 3 months before they’re used

You must make sure the tyres do not endanger human health or the environment. You must not:

  • cause a risk to water, air, soil, plants or animals
  • cause a nuisance through noise or odours
  • adversely affect the countryside or places of special interest

Enforcement
An RPS means that the Environment Agency will not normally take enforcement action against you provided:

  1. your activity meets the description set out in this RPS
  2. you comply with the conditions set out in this RPS
  3. your activity does not (and is not likely to) cause environmental pollution or harm human health

Time Expiry of RPS
RPS 139 is time-limited and is proposed to be reviewed on 31 January 2021.

A copy of the Environment Agency’s Regulatory Position Statement 139 is freely available here

ACTION POINTS

  1. Review your current activities as either a waste tyre supplier or operator of a water reservoir to understand whether the Environment Agency’s RPS 139 applies to your organisation and activities as a compliance obligation.
  2. If RPS 139 applies to your activities in the use of waste tyres for use as escape ladders in water storage reservoirs follow the conditions of the RPS.
  3. Check back for any revised guidance with the Environment Agency no later than 31 January 2021
Posted in Business Benefits, Compliance, Environment Agency, Waste | Leave a comment | Edit
Posted in Business Benefits, Compliance, Environment Agency, Environmental, Waste | Leave a comment

Brexit Briefing: Weekly Media Summary – 19 January 2018


Brexit Briefing - Weekly Summary

This Friday’s edition of the Brexit Briefing is part of the series of posts to highlight articles published in the media covering Brexit from an environmental perspective.

The articles are presented in chronological order with the most recent articles first. They are not presented in any specific order of importance & are provided as a selected sample of news articles to promote understanding of the key environmental issues as they develop during the Brexit process.

The selected articles from this past week, which saw a UK Parliament vote in favour of the legislative blueprint for Brexit, the pro-EU House of Lords will have their say next & Boris offers to “bridge” closer ties with the EU, are:

To Convince Voters May Must Focus On Sincerity, Not The Environment (HuffPost, 19 January 2018)

Government to carry out major environmental assessment of UK seas (The Guardian, 19 January 2018)

Boris Johnson’s Channel bridge entirely possible, say experts (The Times, 19 January 2018)

May Once Again Refuses to Say How She Would Vote on Brexit Now (Bloomberg, 18 January 2018)

Brexit checks UK environmental consulting market growth (EnvironmentAnalyst, 18 January 2018)

As May Beats a Path to Brexit, EU Opens Door for U.K. Return (Bloomberg, 17 January 2018)

What does Brexit mean for sustainability in the built environment? (RICS, 17 January 2018)

Facebook Is Investigating Possible Russia Meddling in Brexit (Bloomberg, 17 January 2018)

Justine Greening: Next generation of MPs could ‘improve or undo’ Brexit (BBC News, 17 January 2017)

MPs back Brexit legislation, stiffer tests yet to come (Reuters, 17 January 2018)

One in three businesses put growth plans on hold due to Brexit (The Irish Times, 17 January 2018)

EU Toughens Demands on U.K. for Brexit Transition in Draft (Bloomberg, 16 January 2918)

Leave campaign’s £350m claim was too low, says Boris Johnson (The Guardian, 15 January 2018)

Tory Rebels to Pass Battle Over May’s Key Brexit Bill to Lords (Bloomberg, 15 January 2018)

Explainer: Breaking down the Scottish Government’s Brexit impact study (CommonSpace, 15 January 2018)

Jeremy Corbyn rules out UK staying in single market after Brexit (The Herald, 14 January 2018)

Senior Scottish Tory warns Brexit row could end up in court (The Scotsman, 14 January 2018)

DUP leader Arlene Foster calls for close Anglo-Irish relations during Brexit talks (Sky News, 13 January 2018)

Spanish and Dutch Agree to Seek Soft Brexit Deal (Bloomberg, 12 January 2018)

Second EU referendum would reverse the Brexit vote reveals shock poll for the Mirror (Mirror, 11 January 2018)

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Brexit Briefing: Weekly Media Summary – 12 January 2018


Brexit Briefing - Weekly Summary

This Friday’s edition of the Brexit Briefing is part of the series of posts to highlight articles published in the media covering Brexit from an environmental perspective.

The articles are presented in chronological order with the most recent articles first. They are not presented in any specific order of importance & are provided as a selected sample of news articles to promote understanding of the key environmental issues as they develop during the Brexit process.

The selected articles from this past week, which saw the a UK Government re-shuffle & the publication of a 25-year Environment Plan, are:

The greenwashing of Theresa May (Politico.eu, 11 January 2018)

Brexit Bulletin: 482,000 Jobs? (Bloomberg, 11 January 2018)

Theresa May pledges Brexit Britain will lead global fight against plastic pollution (Politico.eu, 11 January 2018)

Brexit legislation ‘may breach environmental democracy laws’ (EnergyLive News, 10 January 2018

Theresa May’s environment speech: A 10 point green economy wish-list (BusinessGreen, 10 January 2018)

Brexit bill may have broken international environment law, says UN (The Guardian, 9 January 2018)

New enforcement agency could be in place before Brexit (letsrecycle.com, 9 January 2018)

Theresa May’s cabinet reshuffle: promotions, demotions and exits (The Guardian, 9 January 2018)

Brexit Bulletin: Weak and Stable? (Bloomberg, 9 January 2018)

The Tory trade bill would usher in the worst bits of TTIP – it must be stopped (The Guardian, 8 January 2018)

‘Rural resilience’: Gove outlines future vision for farming post-Brexit (FarmingUK, 8 January 2018)

May to move or sack quarter of cabinet in wide-ranging reshuffle (The Guardian, 7 January 2018)

Brexit Bulletin: How the Deal Could Unravel (Bloomberg, 5 January 2018)

Farmers to be paid for helping the environment after Brexit (Metro, 4 January 2018)

Liam Fox’s Pacific plan is toxic. Post-Brexit trade policies need proper scrutiny (The Guardian, 4 January 2018)

Focus on quality not weakened regulation post-Brexit, Gove tells farmers (The Guardian, 4 January 2018)

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